Our Christianity can be defined and explained through one powerful liturgy: The Nicene Creed. You’re, no doubt, more familiar with the Apostles’ Creed—one of most ancient of affirmations of faith used by all branches of Christendom. It’s a compact way of defining faith and jumps from Jesus’ birth to crucifixion. But Jesus lived a whole life in between. The Nicene Creed acknowledges that and explains what mean when we talk about the communion of saints, the holy catholic church, and everlasting life. It wrestles with the theological issues that define ancient Christianity. Together, we’ll explore this creed and figure out what our past has to say about our faith today.

Rev. Dr. Kip Laxson

Watch the Service:

Corresponding Scripture:  Revelation 21:1-7 (NRSV) 

Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth; for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and the sea was no more. And I saw the holy city, the new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying,

“See, the home[a] of God is among mortals.
He will dwell[b] with them;
they will be his peoples,[c]
and God himself will be with them;[d]
he will wipe every tear from their eyes.
Death will be no more;
mourning and crying and pain will be no more,
for the first things have passed away.”

And the one who was seated on the throne said, “See, I am making all things new.” Also he said, “Write this, for these words are trustworthy and true.” Then he said to me, “It is done! I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end. To the thirsty I will give water as a gift from the spring of the water of life. Those who conquer will inherit these things, and I will be their God and they will be my children.

Feb. 28, 2021: “From Here to Eternity”