Our Christianity can be defined and explained through one powerful liturgy: The Nicene Creed. You’re, no doubt, more familiar with the Apostles’ Creed—one of most ancient of affirmations of faith used by all branches of Christendom. It’s a compact way of defining faith and jumps from Jesus’ birth to crucifixion. But Jesus lived a whole life in between. The Nicene Creed acknowledges that and explains what mean when we talk about the communion of saints, the holy catholic church, and everlasting life. It wrestles with the theological issues that define ancient Christianity. Together, we’ll explore this creed and figure out what our past has to say about our faith today.

Rev. Dr. Kip Laxson

Watch the Service:

Corresponding Scripture: Mark 9:14-24 (ESV)

14 And when they came to the disciples, they saw a great crowd around them, and scribes arguing with them. 15 And immediately all the crowd, when they saw him, were greatly amazed and ran up to him and greeted him. 16 And he asked them, “What are you arguing about with them?” 17 And someone from the crowd answered him, “Teacher, I brought my son to you, for he has a spirit that makes him mute. 18 And whenever it seizes him, it throws him down, and he foams and grinds his teeth and becomes rigid. So I asked your disciples to cast it out, and they were not able.” 19 And he answered them, “O faithless generation, how long am I to be with you? How long am I to bear with you? Bring him to me.” 20 And they brought the boy to him. And when the spirit saw him, immediately it convulsed the boy, and he fell on the ground and rolled about, foaming at the mouth. 21 And Jesus asked his father, “How long has this been happening to him?” And he said, “From childhood. 22 And it has often cast him into fire and into water, to destroy him. But if you can do anything, have compassion on us and help us.” 23 And Jesus said to him, “‘If you can’! All things are possible for one who believes.” 24 Immediately the father of the child cried out[a]and said, “I believe; help my unbelief!”

Jan. 10, 2021: “The Need for a Creed”