Our Christianity can be defined and explained through one powerful liturgy: The Nicene Creed. You’re, no doubt, more familiar with the Apostles’ Creed—one of most ancient of affirmations of faith used by all branches of Christendom. It’s a compact way of defining faith and jumps from Jesus’ birth to crucifixion. But Jesus lived a whole life in between. The Nicene Creed acknowledges that and explains what mean when we talk about the communion of saints, the holy catholic church, and everlasting life. It wrestles with the theological issues that define ancient Christianity. Together, we’ll explore this creed and figure out what our past has to say about our faith today.

Rev. Dr. Kip Laxson

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Corresponding Scripture: Mark 8:27-36

27 And Jesus went on with his disciples to the villages of Caesarea Philippi. And on the way he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that I am?” 28 And they told him, “John the Baptist; and others say, Elijah; and others, one of the prophets.” 29 And he asked them, “But who do you say that I am?” Peter answered him, “You are the Christ.” 30 And he strictly charged them to tell no one about him.

31 And he began to teach them that the Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders and the chief priests and the scribes and be killed, and after three days rise again. 32 And he said this plainly. And Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him. 33 But turning and seeing his disciples, he rebuked Peter and said, “Get behind me, Satan! For you are not setting your mind on the things of God, but on the things of man.”

34 And calling the crowd to him with his disciples, he said to them, “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. 35 For whoever would save his life[a] will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake and the gospel’s will save it. 36 For what does it profit a man to gain the whole world and forfeit his soul?

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January 24, 2021: Born to Die